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The 2015 IPC International Summer School for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines
with the theme “Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture”

is pleased to announce the eleven fellows who will be attending this year's Summer School,
from July 26 to 29, 2015, at the Ateneo de Manila University:

1. Chester Antonino C. Arcilla
-- PhD candidate in Sociology, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
-- Title of paper: “’Lumaban na tayo! Wala na tayong pupuntahan!’ [We must fight! We have nowhere to go!]: An ethnography of a state-sponsored demolition and ‘barikadang bayan’ [slum community barricade]”

2. Mae U. Caralde
-- PhD student in Media Studies, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
-- Title of paper: “Of bodies, death and martyrdom: The case of Ninoy and Cory Aquino's death and the re-articulations of Philippine political narratives”

3. Rosa Cordillera A. Castillo
-- PhD candidate in Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
-- Title of paper: “The will to remember: Discoursing massacres and becoming mujahideens”

4. Caroline Compton
-- PhD student in Law, Australian National University
-- Title of paper: “Extractive institutions and property insecurity in the Philippines: A historical analysis”

5. Stephanie T. Fajardo
-- PhD student in History, University of Michigan, USA
-- Title of paper: “Gender, Power, and Social Order: Venereal Disease Control and the War on Prostitutes in the Postwar Philippines”

6. Naoki Fujiwara
-- PhD student in Politics, Kobe University, Japan
-- Title of paper: “Gentrification and Segregation in the Process of Neoliberal Urbanization of Metro Manila”

7. Yuria Furusawa
-- PhD student in Art History, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan
-- Title of paper: “Brown Madonna Painting by Galo B. Ocampo: Its Early History and Possibility of Retouch”

8. Carlos Isabel Gala
-- PhD candidate in Contemporary History, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
-- Title of paper: “The Royal Decree of 1863 on Primary Education: The problem of the evaluation of its success”

9. Jonathon G. Malek
-- PhD student in History, Western University, Canada
-- Title of paper: “Silangan Rising: Filipino Cultural Identity Negotiation”

10. Ruel V. Pagunsan
-- PhD candidate in History, National University of Singapore
-- Title of paper: “Imperial collecting: Philippine natural history, American colonialism and the empire of science”

11. Carlos M. Piocos III
-- PhD Candidate in Comparative Literature, University of Hong Kong
-- Title of paper: “Suffering that Counts: The Politics of Sacrifice in Filipina Labor Migration”

Congratulations to this year's IPC Summer School fellows!

About the IPC International Summer School

The IPC International Summer School for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines is an annual IPC program (from 2013 to 2015) where promising PhD students in the social sciences or interdisciplinary programs from around the world are invited for an intensive series of workshops, seminars, and lectures. Organized by Lisandro E. Claudio, PhD and Marita Concepcion Castro Guevara, PhD, this year's Summer School will be held from July 26 to 29, 2015 at the Ateneo de Manila University. With the theme "Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture," the Summer School addresses questions about how historical and ethnographic approaches contribute to a closer understanding of Philippine social realities, what principles inform their conceptual and methodological orientations, and whether these approaches can be extended to other aspects of Philippine studies. As in previous years, this year's Summer School fellows were selected based on their submission of a never-published paper appropriate to the theme of the IPC Summer School.

The four-day Summer School will include presentations by the eleven doctoral researchers on their paper and subsequent discussion by the group of participants. Two leading scholars in Philippine Studies, Caroline S. Hau, PhD, and Mary Racelis, PhD (honoris causa), will moderate the discussion, provide feedback on the work of the Summer School fellows, and deliver public lectures on their own research.

The 2015 Institute of Philippine Culture International Summer School
for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines

with the theme

Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture

cordially invites you to

The Woman Who Had Two Navels: Multiple Colonialism and Its Philippine Legacies

a public lecture by

Caroline S. Hau, PhD
Professor
Center for Southeast Asian Studies
Kyoto University

on

Tuesday, 28 July 2015
5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Faber Hall 101
Ateneo de Manila University
Loyola Heights, Quezon City

Abstract

This paper looks at how National Artist Nick Joaquin has dealt with two important historical junctures—the transition from Spanish to American colonial eras, and the transition from American to post-colonial eras—in Philippine modernity in his classic novel The Woman Who Had Two Navels (1961). Joaquin has courted controversy for arguing in favor of Spain's role in nurturing a class of ilustrado (enlightened) patriots who would go on to play a vanguard role alongside municipal elites and the urban middle sector in the Philippine independence movement and revolution in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Going against the populist turn in Philippine scholarship, Joaquin highlights the fact that ilustrados saw themselves as bearers of enlightenment and members of a transcontinental anti-colonial intellectual and activist network, though he overlooks the important role played by late Spanish colonial Philippines’ insertion into the Asian regional economic system underpinned by what we now call “Anglo-Pacific” trade in the emergence of the new social and critical forces exemplified by the ilustrado, the municipal elites, and urban middle sector. Joaquin offers a stringent critique of American colonialism, arguing that it substantially shaped the (mis)fortunes of the post-colonial Philippine nation-state, not least in terms of the narrowing of the country’s intellectual, cultural, political, and economic horizons into a classic (neo)colony, and in terms of the consolidation through "democratic" elections of a Filipino oligarchy that remained economically tied to the United States while also seeking ways to expand the space for its own freedom of action. Neither the “special relationship” with America during the Cold War era (a relationship that helped jumpstart some of the developmental state projects in the region, notably Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan) nor the nationalist Filipino elite’s capture of the commanding heights of the economy and polity has served the Philippines well. Instead, the ilustrados would bear the brunt of the blame for the political impasse of the democratic system that tipped into economic crisis in the 1970s, and the failed attempt at creating a developmental state during the Marcos era that ended in economic crisis and the so-called "People Power Revolution" in the 1980s. The Philippines would serve not only as a typecase of the anti-developmental state, the messy-democratic Other that Lee Kuan Yew and Thai politicians invoke to justify their own authoritarian rule, but also provide the keywords “People Power” and “crony capitalism” that served as the intellectual ballast for American attempts to reshape the East Asian region by criticizing, if not dismantling, the East Asian developmental state in the 1980s and 1990s.

Joaquin's novel is a meditation on political possibilities that were opened up and foreclosed by multiple colonialism, among them the Asianist-turned-Communist network in which Hong Kong (and Yokohama) served as a crucial site of border-crossing activism for the Philippine revolutionary government at the turn of the 20th century, and the emergence of the "overseas Filipino" and “Filipino foreigner” (foreign-born Filipinos) as emblematic figures of the Philippines' opting out of the developmental path taken by the East Asian and Southeast Asian states in the 21st century. This paper demonstrates the ways in which insights generated from a multidisciplinary approach to the study of culture may help us better understand not only the debates in Philippine studies but also the “developmental paths” the Philippines has taken over the last two hundred tumultuous years.

About the IPC International Summer School

The IPC International Summer School for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines is an annual IPC program (from 2013 to 2015) where promising PhD students in the social sciences or interdisciplinary programs from around the world are invited for an intensive series of workshops, seminars, and lectures. Organized by Lisandro E. Claudio, PhD and Marita Concepcion Castro Guevara, PhD, this year's Summer School will be held from July 26 to 29, 2015 at the Ateneo de Manila University. With the theme "Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture," the Summer School addresses questions about how historical and ethnographic approaches contribute to a closer understanding of Philippine social realities, what principles inform their conceptual and methodological orientations, and whether these approaches can be extended to other aspects of Philippine studies. As in previous years, the 2015 IPC Summer School fellows were selected based on their submission of a never-published paper appropriate to the theme of the Summer School.

The four-day Summer School will include presentations by the eleven doctoral researchers on their paper and subsequent discussion by the group of participants. Two leading scholars in Philippine Studies, Caroline S. Hau, PhD, and Mary Racelis, PhD (honoris causa), will moderate the discussion, provide feedback on the work of the Summer School fellows, and deliver public lectures on their own research.

* For inquiries or confirmation of your attendance at the public lecture of Dr. Caroline S. Hau, please contact (+63 2) 426-6001 extension 4651 local 213, or email us at .

Institute of Philippine Culture (IPC)
School of Social Sciences
2/F Frank Lynch Hall, Social Development Complex
Ateneo de Manila University
Katipunan Ave., Loyola Heights, 1108 Quezon City, Philippines
Tel Nos.: (+63 2) 426-6001 ext. 4651 loc. 213; (+63 2) 426 6067 loc. 213
Fax No.: (+63 2) 426-6067 loc. 121
Email: ipc.soss@ateneo.edu
Website: ipc-ateneo.org

The 2015 Institute of Philippine Culture International Summer School for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines

 

with the theme
 
Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture
 
cordially invites you to
 
 
Objectivity? Advocacy? Or Both? The Case for an Engaged Anthropology
                                                
a public lecture by 
 
Mary Racelis
Research Scientist, Institute of Philippine Culture
Professorial Lecturer, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
School of Social Sciences
Ateneo de Manila University
 
on
 
Wednesday, 29 July 2015
5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
Faber Hall 101
Ateneo de Manila University
Loyola Heights, Quezon City
 
Abstract
 
In keeping with its identity as a science, anthropology has honored the principle of objectivity or neutrality in the course of data gathering and analysis. Early anthropological field research emanating mainly from Europe or the United States portrayed the people studied as different, even exotic, but having a cultural validity and logic of their own when viewed from the emic perspective. Bronislaw Malinowski put the challenge of fieldwork this way: “to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realize his vision of his world.” In this way did new theories reshape those already in existence.
 
By the second half of the 20th century, however, the massive effects of global incursions on ordinary people pushed many anthropologists to query professional detachment from their subjects. All too glaring were the negative effects of decolonization, displacement, forced migration, externally generated development programs, unrelenting market forces, warfare, even genocide on families and communities. More and more anthropologists felt they had to speak up to defend “my people” and denounce the powerful groups, social structures and global systems that were bringing poverty, misery, sickness, death, and the destruction of culture to thousands of often defenseless victims. When the latter actively resisted these incursions into their lives, they would find themselves classified as rebels by the state and dealt with accordingly. Some resident anthropologists thus began to move away from their once “neutral” or “detached” roles in favor of activist and advocacy stances derived from a social justice and human rights framework.
 
Engaged or public anthropology is a product of this ferment, bringing forth scholar-practitioners actively committed to helping and taking sides with their subject populations. Discussed in detail in this presentation are evolving trends in the new roles, difficulties and breakthroughs encountered, and the particular constraints posed by detached academic institutions. Examples of engaged anthropology in the Philippines are brought out, together with practical and ethical issues, implications for theory development and knowledge management “from below” as the subjects of research become partners in the study of their societies. Significant are the political ramifications affecting anthropologists engaging with vulnerable subgroups in their own societies versus those studying societies other than their own. The presentation concludes with the speaker’s own experiences as an engaged or public anthropologist and her proposed strategies for sustaining activist scholarship with and for people.




 
About the IPC International Summer School
 
The IPC International Summer School for Doctoral Researchers on the Philippines is an annual IPC program (from 2013 to 2015) where promising PhD students in the social sciences or interdisciplinary programs from around the world are invited for an intensive series of workshops, seminars, and lectures. Organized by Lisandro E. Claudio, PhD and Marita Concepcion Castro Guevara, PhD, this year's Summer School will be held from July 26 to 29, 2015 at the Ateneo de Manila University. With the theme "Historical and Ethnographic Approaches to Philippine Culture," the Summer School addresses questions about how historical and ethnographic approaches contribute to a closer understanding of Philippine social realities, what principles inform their conceptual and methodological orientations, and whether these approaches can be extended to other aspects of Philippine studies. As in previous years, the 2015 IPC Summer School fellows were selected based on their submission of a never-published paper appropriate to the theme of the Summer School.
 
The four-day Summer School will include presentations by the eleven doctoral researchers on their own work and subsequent discussion by the group of participants. Two leading scholars in Philippine Studies, Caroline S. Hau, PhD, and Mary Racelis, PhD (honoris causa), will moderate the discussion, provide feedback on the work of the Summer School fellows, and deliver public lectures on their own research.
 
 
 
IPC at 50

 The Institute of Philippine Culture of the School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University will be celebrating its 53rd anniversary with the book launch of IPC at 50: Celebrating Social Science Research and Training. This will be held on Monday, 16 September 2013, four o'clock in the afternoon, at Faber Hall 101, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City.

The book IPC at 50: Celebrating Social Science Research and Training is a tribute to the contributions to the social sciences of the IPC. On the occasion of its fifty-third anniversary, the IPC in this book gathers 53 memoirs written by 55 present and former IPC staff members and affiliates. In their memoirs, the writers share their personal insights on and remembrances of working at the IPC, and being shaped by the pioneering vision of Frank Lynch, SJ. Edited by Cynthia C. Veneracion, the book includes a Foreword by Mary Racelis, an Introduction by Ricardo G. Abad, and an Annotated List of IPC Projects (1960-2010).

The IPC's 53rd anniversary celebration will include a talk on the legacy of Frank Lynch SJ, by Mary Racelis; an overview of the IPC at 50 book project, by Cynthia C. Veneracion; an overview of the IPC at 50 memoirs and memoir writers, by Ricardo G. Abad; "testimonials" by six IPC researchers on what their IPC experience has meant to them; presentation of book copies to University administrators and the memoir writers; and a celebratory dinner.

Do join us in our celebration!

The Institute of Philippine Culture of the School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University is  hosting an annual international summer school aimed  to pool together the most promising young researchers on the Philippines. Organized by Dr. Lisandro Claudio and Dr. Czarina Saloma-Akpedonu, the summer school will be held on  2-5 June 2013 in Ateneo de Manila University with the theme,  “Historical and ethnographic approaches to Philippine culture.” 

IPC is pleased to announce this year's Summer School Fellows: